Guide to Free and Basic Bot Farm for Guerrilla Marketing

This guide will teach you how to create a simple bot farm which a single person can run and maintain, oh and it’s going to be free.
The number of bots I recommend starting with is seven. It’s relatively simple to manage and, from my experience, it’s enough to give somewhat positive results.

Why run a bot farm?

To control the narrative on social media
To manipulate public opinion
To gamble various ranking algorithms
To improve crowd marketing results

What you need to start a farm.

Gmail accounts.

multiple google accounts

You’ll need these to register on social media platforms and websites you plan to work with.

The hard way (recommended):

Create seven separate Gmail accounts.
You’ll need seven phone numbers to confirm registrations, so it may not be free. There are services online which allow you to receive such messages for free, but most of the times the numbers they provide are already in use. Paid options are dirt cheap though, you’ll have to spend around $1 to get it done.

gmail confirmation sms
I paid $0.1 to receive this confirmation code via online SMS service

The easy way (proceed with caution):

Create one account and use variations of your email address to register everywhere.
Here’s what I mean.
Let’s say you create a Gmail account and your new email address is mynewemail@gmail.com.
You can use this address and it’s variations to register on the same website multiple times:
my.new.email@gmail.com
mynew.email@gmail.com
myne.wemail@gmail.com
All of these addresses are identical for Google but different for other websites, so you can use one email multiple times.
Cons: will not work for Google+, YouTube and other Google services (works fine with most social media websites).
Will not work on smaller websites — if admin even takes a look at the list of users he will see what’s up.

Browser profiles

user agent switcher

Assign a different browser profile for every bot you have.  Make sure that bot number one is always on Android, bot number two is always using Safari and so on.
For small farms, addon such as User-Agent switcher for Chrome (not an ad, it’s free) will do the trick.

IP Addresses

This is where it gets tricky (if you want to match the budget of $0).

There are plenty of free VPNs and proxies to choose from, but they are unreliable and are added to the spam lists pretty quick. Using them is no the best option.
Here’s what you should if you don’t feel like spending $10/mo to buy proxies.

Instead of assigning IP addresses to your bots, assign countries, obscure countries work best (by obscure I mean the ones where people don’t usually visit websites you’re trying to rush with bots). Make sure that bot number one always logs in from Macedonia, bot number two from Belarus and so on (unless your target websites are from Macedonia or Belarus).
Then look online for free services which provide IP addresses in these countries and use these free services to switch your IPs accordingly.

Tip: don’t use free Indian, Chinese, Russian and similar IPs, they are usually under very heavy load and also end up on spam lists.

Spreadsheet

Similar to the one I used in the previous post about guerrilla marketing basics.

bot farm management

Use it to store information about your bots, so you always know which proxy and browser profiles to use with your accounts. Make sure to tie every account to its dedicated location and browser profile.

Level-up your bots

Once you’ve got the essentials, start creating personas. In other words — turn your bot farm into people.
Three websites you must register at first, are Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. These three are where account age and activities matter the most. These accounts can later be used to register on other websites, forums, crowdsource platforms and etc.
Start adding friends, getting followers, post stuff, share stuff, do as much as possible to fill up your pages to the point where it’s not obvious that these accounts are new.

In my next post, I will share some tips and tricks you can use to improve your accounts on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. How to convince people that you are not a bot and how to prepare your bots for action.

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